Report Writing Course

Report Writing Course

Report Writing Course

Report Writing Course

This  Report Writing Course is for people who wish to improve their ability to prepare and deliver any form of business information in a written format, i.e. via reports, letters or emails. The correct format for creating interesting and factual reports and letters is not rocket science. In fact, once people have attended our report writing course they will have developed some very useful and practical skills that they will automatically use again and again as they work so well.

Our course focuses on what is a report?, why is report writing important?, report writing as a skill, planning, mind mapping, the process of writing a report (generally), editing, the 4 stages method for reports, preparation, arrangement, modern writing techniques and email etiquette.

All our trainers are professionally qualified with years of experience delivering tailored training for some of Ireland's most respected organisations  such as SME’S, large multinationals, Government Departments, Charities, County Councils and so on.  Protrain courses are tailored to reflect the real world your staff work in so your input is critical to make certain we customise the course to your needs and make this report writing course a true success. We would love to answer any questions you might have about our  report writing course.

Report Writing Course Objectives

At the end of this Report Writing course, participants will be able to:

  • Master a number of immediately applicable business / report writing techniques
  • Ensure reports are well structured, flow logically and look professional
  • Make reports easier to read and understand
  • Ensure reports and documents meet their intended objectives
  • Produce documents that enhance your image and that of the organisation

Report Writing Course Content

  • What is a report?
  • Why is business writing important?
  • Business writing as a skill
  • Planning
  • Mind Mapping
  • The process of business writing (generally)
  • Editing
  • 4 stages method for reports
  • Preparation
  • Arrangement
  • Business Writing techniques
  • Email
  • Writers block

Report Writing Course Duration

1 Day

Contact Us about our report writing course

Or FREEPHONE us on 1800 989 543

Report Writing Tips

Today’s business world is almost entirely information-driven. Whether you run a small business or occupy a small corner of the org-chart at a massive multinational corporation, chances are that the bulk of your job consists of communicating with others, most often in writing. Of course there’s email and the traditional business letter, but most business people are also called on to write presentations, memos, proposals, business requirements, training materials, promotional copy, grant proposals, and a wide range of other documents.

Here’s the rub: most business people have little experience with writing. While those with business degrees probably did a bit of writing in school, it’s rarely stressed in business programs, and learning to write well is hardly the driving force behind most people’s desire to go to business school. Those without a university background might have never been pushed to write at all, at least since public school.

If you’re one of the many people in business for whom writing has never been a major concern, you should know that a lack of writing skills is a greater and greater handicap with every passing year. Spending some time to improve your writing can result in a marked improvement in your hireability and promotional prospects. There’s no substitute for practice, but here are a few pointers to put you on the right track.

  1. Less is more.

In business writing as in virtually every other kind of writing, concision matters. Ironically, as written information becomes more and more important to the smooth functioning of businesses, people are less and less willing to read. Increasingly, magazines and other outlets that used to run 2,000-word features are cutting back to 500-word sketches. Use words sparingly, cut out the florid prose, and avoid long, meandering sentences. As Zorro taught his son, “Get in, make your Z, and get out!” – get straight to the point, say what you want to say, and be done with it.

  1. Avoid jargon.

Everyone in business hates business writing, all that “blue-sky solutioneering” and those “strategical synergies” that ultimately, mean nothing; “brainstorming” and “opportunities to work together” are more meaningful without sounding ridiculous. While sometimes jargon is unavoidable – in a business requirement document or technical specification, for example – try using plainer language. Even for people in the same field as you, jargon is often inefficient – the eye slides right past it without really catching the meaning. There’s a reason that jargon is so often used when a writer wants to not say anything.

  1. Write once, check twice.

Proofread immediately after you write, and then again hours or, better yet, days later. Nothing is more embarrassing than a stupid typo in an otherwise fine document. It’s hardly fair – typos happen! – but people judge you for those mistakes anyway, and harshly. Except in the direct emergency, always give yourself time to set your writing aside and come back to it later. The brain is tricky and will ignore errors that it’s just made; some time working on something else will give you the detachment you need to catch those errors before anyone else reads them.

  1. Write once, check twice.

I know, I just said this, but I mean something else here. In addition to catching typos and other errors, putting some time between writing and re-reading your work can help you catch errors of tone that might otherwise escape you and cause trouble. For instance, when we’re upset or angry, we often write things we don’t actually want anyone else to read. Make sure your work says what you want it to say, how you want it to say it, before letting it reach its audience.

  1. Pay special attention to names, titles, and genders.

OK, there is one thing more embarrassing than a typo: calling Mr. Smith “Ms. Smith” consistently throughout a document. If you’re not positive about the spelling of someone’s name, their job title (and what it means), or their gender, either a) check with someone who does know (like their assistant), or b) in the case of gender, use gender-neutral language. “They” and “their” are rapidly becoming perfectly acceptable gender-neutral singular pronouns, despite what your grammar teacher and the self-righteous grammar Nazi down the hall might say.

  1. Save templates.

Whenever you write an especially good letter, email, memo, or other document, if there’s the slightest chance you’ll be writing a similar document in the future, save it as a template for future use. Since rushing through writing is one of the main causes of typos and other errors, saving time by using a pre-written document can save you the embarrassment of such errors. Just make sure to remove any specific information – names, companies, etc. – before re-using it – you don’t want to send a letter to Mr. Sharif that is addressed to Mrs. O’Toole!

  1. Be professional, not necessarily formal.

There’s a tendency to think of all business communication as formal, which isn’t necessary or even very productive. Formal language is fine for legal documents and job applications, but like jargon often becomes invisible, obscuring rather than revealing its meaning. At the same time, remember that informal shouldn’t mean unprofessional – keep the personal comments, off-colour jokes, and snarky gossip out of your business communications. Remember that many businesses (possibly yours) are required by law to keep copies of all correspondence – don’t email, mail, or circulate anything that you wouldn’t feel comfortable having read into the record in a public trial.

  1. Remember the 5 W’s (and the H)

Just like a journalist’s news story, your communications should answer all the questions relevant to your audience: Who? What? When? Where? Why? and How? For example, who is this memo relevant to, what should they know, when and where will it apply, why is it important, and how should they use this information? Use the 5W+H formula to try to anticipate any questions your readers might ask, too.

  1. Call to action.

The content of documents that are simply informative are rarely retained very well. Most business communication is meant to achieve some purpose, so make sure they include a call to action – something that the reader is expected to do. Even better, something the reader should do right now. Don’t leave it to your readers to decide what to do with whatever information you’ve provided – most won’t even bother, and enough of the ones who do will get it wrong that you’ll have a mess on your hands before too long.

  1. Don’t give too many choices.

Ideally, don’t give any. If you’re looking to set a time for a meeting, give a single time and ask them to confirm or present a different time. At most, give two options and ask them to pick one. Too many choices often leads to decision paralysis, which generally isn’t the desired effect.

  1. What’s in it for your readers?

A cornerstone of effective writing is describing benefits, not features. Why should a reader care? For example, nobody cares that Windows 7 can run in 64-bit mode – what they care about is that it can handle more memory and thus run faster than the 32-bit operating system. 64-bits is a feature; letting me get my work done more quickly is the benefit. Benefits engage readers, since they’re naturally most concerned with finding out how they can make their lives easier or better.

You may also be interested in our other courses:

Appraisal Skills Financial Awareness Course Reception Skills
Assertiveness Skills Interviewing Skills Recruitment Interviewing & Training Skills
Change Management Course Inventory Management Course Report Writing Course
Coaching Skills Course Leadership Course Sales Skills
Communication Courses Management Skills Stress Management Course
Customer Service Course Managing Meetings Supervisory Management Course
Customer Service Training Minute Taking Course Telephone Skills
Dealing With Aggressive People Negotiation Skills Telesales Training
Debt Collection Course Performance Management Time Management Skills
Digital Marketing Course Presentation Training Train The Trainer Course
Dignity At Work Project Management Course Warehouse Management Training
Effective Communication Skills Project Planning

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FREEPHONE us on 1800 989 543

Some of our respected clients

Arbour Care Fingal County Council Pfizer
Baxter Storey Ireland Gaffer Trading Ltd Roscommon County Council
Beltronics Galway City Council Ryanair PLC
Beyond Entertainment Gill Manufacturing & Assembly Savills
BNP Paribas Glanbia PLC Spectrum Logistics
Bord Bia Grant Thornton St Gerard’s Private School
Cahill May Roberts H2 Compliance The Commissioner of Irish Lights
Carlow County Council Health Information and Quality Authority The Houses of the Oireachtas
Cavan County Council Hickeys Fabrics The HSE
CBRE IBRC The Institute of Technology Blanchardstown
Celtic Aerospace Independent Newspapers (Ireland) Limited The Institute of Technology Tralee
Clare County Council Irish Trucks The Irish Stock Exchange
Clarion Hotels IFSC KMK Metals The Irish Aviation Authority
CombiLift Laois County Council The Lawrence Life Insurance
Commission for Communications Regulation LC Seating The Marine Institute
Cork City Council Limerick City and County Council The National College of Ireland
Cruinn Diagnostics Loyaltybuild The National Consumer Agency
Custom House Fund Services Meath County Council The National Rehabilitation Hospital
Dessian Products Ltd Mercer Consulting The Office of the Ombudsman
DKIT Mercury Engineering The Radiological Protection Institute
Donegal County Council Micro Bio The Training Learners Skillnet
Dublin City University Monaghan County Council The Financial Services Ombudsman
Dublin Institute of Technology Mount Carmel Hospital Trinity College Dublin
Emerald Truck and Van Ltd Movianto Pharmaceuticals Turfgrass Consultancy
ESB Networks NVD Ltd UCD
Eurolink M3 Paddy Power PLC Waterford City and County Council
Ferrycarrig Hotel Peamount Hospital Waterford Institute of Technology
Festo Limited Pearse Trust Windowmate NI Ltd
Fideuram Asset Management PFH Technology 3Q Recruitment